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Photo of the New Zealand Collective Stand

NZ successes at Frankfurt

By News
Photo of Peter Dowling, Catriona Ferguson, Indonesian Literary Agent Alda Trisda and IPA President Elect Hugo Setzer

L-R: Peter Dowling, Catriona Ferguson, Indonesian Literary Agent Alda Trisda and IPA President Elect Hugo Setzer

PANZ Director Catriona Ferguson Reports from Frankfurt Book Fair 2018:

As usual it was all go on the PANZ stand in Hall 6.0 at this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair. Nine publishers spent three busy days in meetings with contacts from around the world; the general vibe at the fair was extremely positive. Kevin Chapman from Upstart Press noted that “It’s been a good fair and the proof will be in what happens next.”

Some reported that foot traffic in the halls felt lighter than it had been in previous years, but in fact this offered a welcome opportunity to focus on meetings without too much distraction. PANZ President Peter Dowling said that the fair had been, “Encouraging on a number of fronts, and there remains a growing interest in children’s and young adults books. Additionally there’s been enthusiasm for our design-led illustrated books.”

Beau Davidson from DHD Publishing attended the fair with his wife, writer Joy Davidson, for the first time. “It teaches you what the world of publishing is really all about; it’s a baptism by fire because you’re meeting all those involved in the industry – printers, online services, freight and packaging. It’s not until you get here that you realise how significant a gathering it really is.”

Sophie Siers from Millwood Press caused a bit of a stir with her delightful picture book Dear Donald Trump “What a fantastic fair, so much enthusiasm on the stand and around the exhibition halls. It was a highlight for Millwood Press to sign our title Dear Donald Trump on the stand to Czech Republic and Slovakia.”

And after busy days there was the usual round of evening stand parties to attend, which provided a host of networking opportunities. Of course the premium of these is the PANZ stand party, which was as successful as usual this year. A host of publishers, agents and VIPs showed up to enjoy some fine New Zealand wine and beer, great conversation and lots of laughs.

We continued to promote the Creative New Zealand/PANZ Translation Fund on the stand and also distributed copies of an Academy of NZ Literature produced anthology that provided enticing extracts of work from a range of Māori and Pasifika writers available for translation, and to participate in international events.

There were also some fresh initiatives happening at the book fair this year, including the first BookFest to be held in the new pavilion onsite at the Buchmesse. New Zealand writer Bridget Van Der Zjipp, who is based in Berlin, joined us in Frankfurt to discuss change and diversity with writers Amanda Lee Koe from Singapore and Min Jin Lee of Korea.

In International Publishers Association (IPA) news, Sam Elworthy and I attended the General Assembly and were delighted to vote enthusiastically in favour of Hugo Setzer’s nomination as President Elect of the IPA and Bodour Al Qasimi as Vice President Elect. They will both take up their positions on 1 January 2019. Read the press release from the IPA here.

We’d like to thank our supporters for helping us to have another successful Frankfurt: freight partner Book Systems and Education New Zealand and Creative New Zealand who contributed to stand costs and provided grants to publishers.

Photo of the New Zealand Collective Stand  Alexandra Smithyman, Deputy Head of Mission of the New Zealand Embassy in Berlin, with Gary Pengelly and Jan Kemp at the New Zealand stand party

Pictured above the New Zealand Collective Stand (left) and Alexandra Smithyman, Deputy Head of Mission of the New Zealand Embassy in Berlin, with Gary Pengelly and Jan Kemp at the New Zealand stand party.

Photo of IPA Executive Committee

New Zealand and the International Publishing World

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Photo of IPA Executive Committee

Sam Elworthy, Director, Auckland University Press reports:

I wore two hats at the Frankfurt Book Fair this year. Most of the time I was on the New Zealand stand rustling up international interest in our upcoming Auckland University Press titles. But for a couple of days I was talking about copyright, accessibility, the challenges of publishing in developing countries and under authoritarian regimes, in meetings of the International Publishers Association where I’m lucky enough to serve on the Executive Committee.

It’s a great group—publishers from Nigeria and Brazil, Spain and India, the UK and the UAE. Some are heads of associations but many of us are working publishers interested in the bigger picture. As an organisation the IPA is about the same size as AUP—ie it is small! So like many of our New Zealand organisations, including PANZ, it relies on people on committees actually doing stuff. And it means the organisation needs to be very focused on what it can (and can’t) do.

What is does well is focus internationally on copyright (in particular at the World Intellectual Property Organisation, whose treaties govern the intellectual property rights we all enjoy) and then jump into counties when those rights are under threat — most recently in Canada, South Africa, Ireland and the EU; at some point maybe New Zealand. And it does similarly good work around freedom to publish — engaging internationally and locally when publishers in places like Hong Kong and Turkey are thrown in jail or put out of business for publishing material critical of the government. And in a more recent thrust, it’s focused on what it can do to support the development of strong publishing in the developing world, working in places like Nigeria to support the growth of a robust publishing industry.

The room was very male, and NZ did our bit this year by helping to elect a woman publisher from Georgia to the executive committee and a UAE publisher, Bodour Al Qasimi, as vice president. When she becomes president it’ll be the first woman president of IPA in almost 30 years. Something to work on.

What can we bring back to New Zealand? I reckon there’s contributions we can make to the wider publishing landscape — working with WIPO/IPA on development of publishing in the parts of our region that aren’t as rich as we are; engaging with the Accessible Books Coalition to make sure our digital books are as accessible as possible to the visually impaired; and supporting our friends in South Africa and Canada, Hong Kong and Turkey when their intellectual property rights or freedom to publish are under threat. New Zealand may well need their support, and that of the IPA, in return some day.

Frankfurt Book Fair Logo

NZ Publishers gear up for the world’s largest book fair

By News

Frankfurt Book Fair Logo

New Zealand publishers are gearing up for the most important book event of the year, the Frankfurt Book Fair.  For five days from 10 October, publishers, agents and authors from all over the world converge to deal in rights and talk books.  With more than 7100 exhibitors from over 100 countries attending the fair this year, the opportunities for rights sales and forging new important publishing relationships are endless.

New Zealand publishers have steadily cemented a firm and respected place at the fair, riding high on the back of being Guest of Honour in 2012. This year, nine publishers from commercial and educational areas of New Zealand publishing will share the collective stand under the PANZ (Publishers Association of New Zealand) banner.

PANZ President and Publisher at Oratia Media, Peter Dowling is expecting another rewarding Frankfurt Book Fair with the usual hectic four days of meetings, deals and dinners promoting New Zealand books and authors.  “Planning for the fair has been going on all year, since doing well at Frankfurt is critical for international publishing.”

“PANZ is fortunate to have the support of Creative New Zealand and Education New Zealand to promote our literature and educational publishing internationally. With help from these two agencies, we’ve worked hard to expand New Zealand’s global presence over the last year, adding two new book fairs to our roster alongside Frankfurt — the Bologna Children’s Book Fair in March, and the Guadalajara International Book Fair in November.”

The fair also connects the PANZ with the International Publishers Association (IPA), which focuses on protecting copyright and freedom of expression worldwide. Auckland University Press Director, Sam Elworthy is currently an Executive Committee member of the IPA, and will attend its AGM along with PANZ Director Catriona Ferguson.

The Publishers Association of New Zealand gratefully acknowledge the support of Creative New Zealand and Education New Zealand.

Further information:

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Sandra Noakes, Tel 0275 767675 or Catriona Ferguson, T 02102482637

On behalf of Publishers Association of New Zealand

Contact details:

Sandra.noakes@harpercollins.co.nz

Intern Programme Applications Open

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Applications are now open for the Creative New Zealand National Publishing Internships Initiative 2019 which offers a Whitireia graduate the opportunity to work in a publishing company for six months. There will be three internships available which will run from February to July 2019. This a terrific opportunity to have a new graduate assisting you with your business.

The programme has produced some impressive results in past years with many publishers choosing to offer the interns full-time positions at the end of the programme and a number of interns now hold senior positions in publishing companies.   Last year’s successful applicants were Allen & Unwin, Bridget Williams Books and Victoria University Press.

“The intern programme allows us to expand our publication schedule and gives us valuable help during busy periods when we need all hands on deck. But more than this, it encourages us to listen to new ideas about publishing from a fresh perspective, and also to reconsider our own roles and tasks from a newcomer’s point of view, and consider how they may be done more effectively,” says Craig Gamble of  Victoria University Press.

Applications are open to trade publishers and also to educational publishers who produce a broad range of titles including picture books, early readers and junior fiction and/or books in te reo as well as Pasifika and Asian languages.

Applications close Friday 21 September and publishers will be advised whether or not they have been successful before 9 October to help with staff planning for the year ahead.  Click here for application form and further criteria.

“Energising and Absorbing” Rachel Lawson on the Yale Publishing Course 2018

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Rachel Lawson, Associate Publisher, Gecko Press was the recipient of the 2018 W.E and M.L Scholarship to the Yale Book Publishing Course. Rachel attended the week-long intensive course which ran from 29 July to 3 August at the Yale School of Management in New Haven Connecticut and reports on her experience.

Yale School of Business Building photo

Yale School of Business building (glass walls represent transparency of good business practice)

The Yale Publishing Course was energising, absorbing, great fun. Forty percent of the participants were international, and I enjoyed being part of the antipodean contingent alongside five Australians. We discovered there was no need to get the giant semi-trailer-like black bus to lectures each morning but could stomp 15 minutes along the road and pick up a decent espresso on the way. And the stomping was important considering the quantity of (good!) food on offer at every break. Mornings were sessions from the charismatic staff from the business school, with heaps of useful material about how to make strong teams and good decisions, the culture of organisations. Afternoons were visitors from the publishing industry. In the spirit of the dozens of powerpoints we were shown, here are some of my bullet points.

Publishers catching the bus photo

Publishers catching the bus

Areas for putting energy mentioned by a number of different speakers

  • Audio books are growing exponentially, and it’s a new market – audio listeners are not print readers
  • ‘Facebook is dead’, not worth our energy (only 2% ‘pass-through rate’ to followers)
  • We need to constantly feedback customers’ words into our message about the book (revise blurbs, media, metadata, ads)
  • Every book needs visual content built for social media – ‘quote cards’, original photography and banners
  • Special sales are just sales – they’re not special any more
  • Multinationals are combining their marketing and publicity departments with little distinction now between the roles/tasks

Stats I found interesting

  • Amazon has 46% of US print sales but books are around 4–5% of their business
  • Audiobook sales have doubled in the past two years
  • Online retail has led to a big shift to backlist: 59% of books sold online are over two years old

Useful tidbits

  • The digital director of PRH told us they only deliver one ebook format (epub3) even to Amazon: ‘it’s not entirely easy but you too can do this!’
  • Craig Mod says, ‘Amazon won’ so the only way to compete is to add value where they can’t, through voice and intimacy. He reckons this is through newsletters and email lists: they are all about voice and playfulness and have direct engagement – ‘the intimacy of the inbox’ (fantastic speaker and probably a great newsletter: craigmod.com)
  • The PRH marketing and publicity department ran through the process of marketing a ‘make book’ and showed us everything we’re up against: five staff members; one year of work; media coaching, tour, website and social media platforms built for the author; three separate advance proofs (the third with a run of 5000 copies) and a total marketing spend of $200K… That’s how you get a book on the New York Times bestseller list.

Favourite quotes

  • Blog posts aren’t dead, they just became emails.
  • Boring retail is dead but exciting retail is alive.
  • Publishing is a terrible business to be in – most books fail!

Applications for the 2019 scholarship will open in October.  Details can be found here

PANZ Book Design Awards 2018

By News

Winning designer Aaron Beehre

Aaron Beehre definitely got his exercise at the PANZ Book Design Awards held on Thursday 26 July. The Canterbury University Press designer took to the stage four times to claim a series of awards and found himself running out of people to thank in his acceptance speeches.

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press) was definitely the hot favourite on the night, with the judges praising the book as “a complete package”, declaring it exquisite and awarding it the Gerard Reid Award for Best Book Sponsored by Nielson Book.

The crowd agreed and it was also awarded the Hachette New Zealand People’s Choice Award, winning by a clear margin.

As if that wasn’t enough, it took out the Penguin Random House New Zealand Award for Best Illustrated Book and the HarperCollins Publishers Award for Best Cover.

This year’s awards were judged by David Coventon (convenor), Anna Brown, Janson Chau and Kiran Dass and were presented at a buzzy ceremony at the Fresh Factory in Eden Terrace.

The Upstart Press Award for Best Non-Illustrated Book was awarded to Sarah Maxey (cover design) and Katrina Duncan (interior design) for Allen Curnow Biography and Poems Slipcase edition by Terry Sturm (Auckland University Press). The book’s use of a single typography throughout captured the judges’ attention and they found the elegant design and classic typographic choices highly evocative of the life lived.

The sophisticated partnering of typography and illustration saw Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story by Gavin Bishop (Penguin Random House) receive the Scholastic New Zealand Award for Best Children’s Book. The book was designed by Vida and Luke Kelly of Kelly Design and illustrated by Gavin Bishop.

Shying away from the obvious primary colours in favour of a muted palette was a risk that paid off for designer Kate Barraclough (Kate Francis Design), who received the Edify Award for Best Educational Book for The New Zealand Art Activity Book by Helen Lloyd (Te Papa Press). The judges found the book fun for kids, user-friendly, practical and engaging.

A cookbook that successfully paired photos, text, stories and food, while delivering something “a little more” design- wise was awarded the 1010 Printing Award for Best Cookbook. Eat Up New Zealand by Al Brown (Allen & Unwin NZ) was designed by Gary Stewart of The Gas Project.

The Mary Egan Publishing Award for Best Typography was awarded to A Moral Truth by James Hollings (Massey University Press), cover design by Gideon Keith and interior design by Gideon Keith and Carla Sy. The judges delighted in the use of the ellipsis as a repeated device alongside the halftone dot illustrations, labelling this a small example of the wit demonstrated in the book.

The Allen & Unwin Young Designer of the Year Award saw two Penguin Random House colleagues battle it out for the top prize. Rachel Clark was declared the winner thanks to her well developed and varied portfolio, which demonstrated a nuanced understanding of the elements of book design.

The awards were followed by a workshop the next day which kicked off with a panel chaired by David Coventon which drew the judges out a little further on their decision-making process and touched on some of the books that they loved but had just missed out on winning the top prize.  Next up Gideon Keith and Spencer Levine got down to the nitty gritty of typography, discussing kerning and exploring whether or not there is such a thing as a bad font. The final session was led by Anna Brown and Kiran Dass and featured Andrew Long (Marketing and Sales Manager from Auckland University Press) and Sally Greer (Beatnik Publishing). The discussion focused on designing for your audience and the differences in approach between university presses and more commercial publishing houses.

 

New China Eyewitness takes top spot in 2018 Book Design Awards

By Media Releases, News

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre took home the accolades and the awards for two categories plus the best overall book design, at the PANZ Book Design Awards announced on Thursday 26 July at a ceremony in Auckland.

New China Eyewitness won the Penguin Random House New Zealand Award for Best Illustrated Book and the HarperCollins Publishers Award for Best Cover, before collecting the Gerard Reid Award for Best Book sponsored by Nielsen Book.

‘As a complete package, it’s exquisite,’ said David Coventon, convenor of the judging panel. ‘New China Eyewitness is a fine example of respectful and thoughtful production values. The paper stock is beautiful. The finely-tuned, nuanced attention to detail makes for a striking and high-quality end product. It accomplishes a great deal of refinement in the face of a complex and demanding set of design requirements.’

Rachel ClarkRachel Clark took home the award for Allen & Unwin Young Designer of the Year 2018 for her portfolio of work which included The Art of Simple by Eleanor Ozich (Penguin Random House), Bird Words edited by Elisabeth Easther (Penguin Random House), Heloise by Mandy Hager (Penguin Random House) and Hideaways by Hilary Ngan Kee and photography by Sam Stuchbury (Penguin Random House).

‘Clark’s design was well-developed, confident and demonstrated a clear response to the subject at hand,’ said judging panel member, Janson Chau. ‘Typography, so often a giveaway for an inexperienced designer, is used thoughtfully with an eye on contemporary practice. Her work can already sit equally among those in other categories, as the judges were impressed to find upon reaching this category after the others.’

There were 110 entries for this year’s awards indicating the art of good book design across commercial and independent publishers, and university presses is in good health, with publishers valuing the investment great design brings.

The PANZ Book Design Awards 2018 Winners Are: 

Gerard Reid Award for Best Book Sponsored by Nielsen Book

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Penguin Random House New Zealand Award for Best Illustrated Book

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Upstart Press Award for Best Non-Illustrated Book

Allen Curnow Biography and Poems Slipcase edition by Terry Sturm. Edited by Linda Cassells, Elizabeth Caffin and Terry Sturm (Auckland University Press), cover design by Sarah Maxey, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Scholastic New Zealand Award for Best Children’s Book

Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story by Gavin Bishop (Penguin Random House), design by Vida and Luke Kelly, Kelly Design, illustrations by Gavin Bishop

Edify Award for Best Educational Book

The New Zealand Art Activity Book: new edition by Helen Lloyd (Te Papa Press), designed by Kate Barraclough, Kate Frances Design

1010 Printing Award for Best Cookbook

Eat Up New Zealand by Al Brown (Allen & Unwin New Zealand), designed by Gary Stewart, The Gas Project

HarperCollins Publishers Award for Best Cover

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Mary Egan Publishing Award for Best Typography

A Moral Truth edited by James Hollings (Massey University Press), cover design by Gideon Keith, Strategy Creative, interior design by Gideon Keith and Carla Sy

Allen & Unwin Young Designer of the Year 2018

Rachel Clark for The Art of Simple by Eleanor Ozich (Penguin Random House), Bird Words edited by Elisabeth Easther (Penguin Random House), Heloise by Mandy Hager (Penguin Random House) and Hideaways by Hilary Ngan Kee with photography by Sam Stuchbury.

 

For full details of the winners, visit the PANZ Book Design Awards website.

PANZ International Conference 2018: Publishing DOES Matter

By News

Publishing Matters: Fresh Perspectives, New Directions was the title of the PANZ International Conference and the programme posed some big questions about the state of the industry in 2018.

 

Questions that were answered with thoughtfulness, clarity and innovative thinking by a diverse range of keynote speakers, all of whom left attendees with valuable insight to take back to their everyday roles. Hugo Setzer, Vice President of the International Publishers Association, gave himself no small task when he set out to address Why Publishing Matters in the opening keynote. Citing a whole range of reasons the industry is crucial, he then asked if we need to get “more Californian” in how we sell ourselves, giving the example of the big tech companies and the emotional connection they offer consumers. Hugo also gave a really clear overview of the work the International Publishers Association does, highlighting the two key issues they are currently focusing on – copyright and the freedom to publish.

Nerrilee Weir, Senior Wrights Manager, Penguin Random House Australia then gave an incredibly insightful overview of the current state of play in the world of rights sales in Global Markets : Finding Your New Zealand Fit. She shared lots of interesting anecdotes and was very candid with details of her own personal approach and insightful about the challenges faced by Antipodean publishers. Promisingly, she believes there’s never been a better time to be selling rights from ANZ authors.

Diversity in publishing is a hot topic, both locally and internationally, so the panel of the same name garnered a lot of interest from the crowd. Gita Jayaram (consultant, Diversity Works), Eboni Waitere (executive director, Huia Publishing), Anton Blank (director, Oranui) and Josie Dobrin (CEO of Creative Access) collaborated on a wide-ranging discussion of the issues and opportunities a more diverse publishing workforce brings.

Denise Cripps might have had the slot before lunch, but her fascinating insight into The Transformative Power of Education kept people’s minds off their rumbling stomachs. Her address was just as interesting for those in trade publishing and there were lots of discussions over lunch around the implications of what she spoke about concerning language development in young children.

The afternoon saw the group split for two workshops. Children Interacting With The Page looked at the current state of play in children’s publishing with a panel made up of Jenny Hellen (publisher, Allen & Unwin), Matt Comeskey (publishing manager, Lift Education), Lynette Evans (publishing manager Scholastic NZ) and Catherine O’Loughlin (publishers children’s, Penguin Random House NZ) discussing what’s working and where things are headed. Augmented reality, sing-a-long stories and beautifully illustrated books with longevity emerged as key trends.

The group then came back together for Louise Sherwin-Stark, CEO of Hachette Australia, who gave a workshop entitled Does Amazon Keep You Awake at Night?. Louise posited that maybe it should, but not for the reasons you think. She assured the audience that Amazon wasn’t something to worry about and then elaborated on the opportunities it brings. As well as offering insight into Amazon and some of their processes, Louise’s presentation was an incredibly practical guide to nailing online sales and there was lots of frantic scribbling as attendees jotted down her wisdom.

The last session of the day saw Joan Mackenzie in conversation with Juliet Rogers, CEO of Murdoch Books and current CEO of the Australian Society of Authors, to deliver Lessons from the Bookshop Floor.  Joan talked about her long career in the industry and her passion for what she does, stating she “loves getting books into people’s hands”.  As someone who reads about 8 books a week, she believes good book buying is a mixture of art and science. She offered helpful insight into what makes the perfect book for Whitcoulls and emphasised the importance of stock being available when marketing and publicity hits.

The evening’s dinner provided a more relaxed opportunity for conference delegates to socialise, with feedback from many that it was a great opportunity to get to know others in the industry and develop and strengthen those crucial networks.

Martin Green of Pantera Press brought incredible energy and passion to his address Behind the Curtain: Finding and Lifting Your Publishing Ambition, which started off detailing what a horrible world we live in. He talked about Pantera’s desire to create an innovative new model of publishing and their belief in being a social purpose business. He outlined all the ways they affect change and support organisations working in literacy and education. Martin urged those present to set their goals ridiculously high, stating that way if you fail, you’re still above everyone else. Further emphasising this, he told the room that if think you’re too small to be effective you’ve never been in the dark with a mosquito.  Martin’s conclusion? “The world sucks and it’s not fair and we can make a difference.” Read Martin’s full speech here.

The conference closed with a very fitting final keynote.  Josie Dobrin addressed Inclusivity and Diversity in Publishing: Why We Should All Care. As well as detailing the incredible work Creative Access has been doing in the UK, she also left publishers with a series of practical steps they can take to better encourage diversity within their company. Josie really emphasised the point that it’s not enough to just hire people from the diverse backgrounds, you also need to make sure the office environment is welcoming – “Don’t just open the door. Invite people in”.

In his summing up, PANZ president Peter Dowling said that he hoped people would take a chance to digest all they’d learnt before they got stuck back into their day jobs. This was a concept supported by Martin of Pantera Press, who had commented that they like to give their staff space to imagine and strategise and urge them to take a day at home just to think. Getting away from the office and having space to absorb new ideas is the biggest advantage of attending a conference like this, with many attendees making comments to this effect.

Between all the buzz, noise, debate, encounters and networking that took place over the two days of the conference there was definitely plenty of proof that publishing matters.

The best of New Zealand’s book designs come under tight scrutiny but the shortlist has been announced

By Media Releases, News

It appears it’s not just the cover a book is judged on as the judges announce the finalists in the 2018 PANZ Book Design Awards.  The weight of stock, the binding and the smell of the entries all came under close scrutiny from the judging panel.

‘The judges all did their fair share of lifting, sniffing, flipping and pondering the multifaceted design decisions,’ says the convening judge, David Coventon.  ‘From paper stocks to spines and binding, print finish, typographic tendencies and idiosyncrasies, we were impressed by the high-quality outcomes.’

From some 110 entries, the judges have whittled out a finalist list of 33 books across eight categories:

Penguin Random House New Zealand Award for Best Illustrated Book

Aberhart Starts Here by Lara Strongman with Laurence Aberhart (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū), designed by Peter Bray, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū

The Domain by Gavin Hipkins (Victoria University Press), designed by Philip Kelly

the merrier by Miranda Parkes, Sharon Dell, Robyn Notman, Sophie Bannan, Andrea Bell (Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago), designed by Daniel Blackball Alexander

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Strangers Arrive by Leonard Bell (Auckland University Press), cover design by Spencer Levine, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Upstart Press Award for Best Non-illustrated Book

Bird Words edited by Elisabeth Easther (Penguin Random House), designed by Rachel Clark

Blood Ties: New and selected poems 1963-2016 by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman (Canterbury University Press), cover design by Aaron Beehre, interior design by Aaron Beehre and Gemma Banks, Ilam Press

Edmund Hillary: A biography by Michael Gill (Potton & Burton), designed by Lisa Noble and Annabelle Archibald, Paperminx

A Moral Truth edited by James Hollings (Massey University Press), cover design by Gideon Keith, Strategy Creative, interior design by Gideon Keith and Carla Sy

Selected Poems: Ian Wedde by Ian Wedde (Auckland University Press), cover design by Philip Kelly, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Allen Curnow Biography and Poems Slipcase edition by Terry Sturm. Edited by Linda Cassells, Elizabeth Caffin and Terry Sturm (Auckland University Press), cover design by Sarah Maxey, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Tears of Rangi by Anne Salmond (Auckland University Press), cover design by Keely O’Shannessy, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Scholastic New Zealand Award for Best Children’s Book

Annual 2 edited by Kate De Goldi and Susan Paris (Annual Ink), cover design by Toby Morris, interior design by Gary Stewart, The Gas Project

Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story by Gavin Bishop (Penguin Random House), design by Vida and Luke Kelly, Kelly Design, illustrations by Gavin Bishop

Helper and Helper by Joy Cowley, illustrated by Gavin Bishop (Gecko Press), designed by Vida Kelly

The Longest Breakfast by Jenny Bornholdt, illustrated by Sarah Wilkins (Gecko Press), designed by Vida Kelly

Summer Days by multiple contributors (Penguin Random House), designed by Jenny Haslimeier, cover illustration by Vasanti Unka, Vasanti Unka Design

Tu Meke Tūī! by Malcolm Clarke (Little Love), designed by Anna Egan-Reid, Little Love, illustrations by FLOX AKA Hayley King

Edify Award for Best Educational Book

Bright Ideas for Young Minds by multiple contributors (Mary Egan Publishing), designed by Anna Egan-Reid, Mary Egan Publishing

How to Mend a Kea by Janet Hunt (Massey University Press), designed by Janet Hunt

The New Zealand Art Activity Book: new edition by Helen Lloyd (Te Papa Press), designed by Kate Barraclough, Kate Frances Design

New Zealand’s Great White Sharks: How science is revealing their secrets by Alison Ballance (Potton & Burton), designed by Chris Chisnall and Robbie Burton

Tūrangawaewae edited by Trudie Cain, Ella Kahu and Richard Shaw (Massey University Press), designed by Kate Barraclough, Kate Frances Design

1010 Printing Award for Best Cookbook

Angelo’s Wild Kitchen by Angelo Georgalli (Beatnik Publishing), designed by Sally Greer, Beatnik Publishing

Eat Up New Zealand by Al Brown (Allen & Unwin New Zealand), designed by Gary Stewart, The Gas Project

The Forest Cantina HOME by Unna Burch (Unna Burch), cover design by Unna Burch and Bonny Beattie, interior design by Amanda Peirson

Homegrown Kitchen: Everyday recipes for eating well by Nicola Galloway (Potton & Burton), designed by Lisa Noble and Annabelle Archibald, Paperminx

Little Bird Goodness by Megan May (Penguin Random House), designed by Kate Barraclough, Kate Frances Design

HarperCollins Publishers Award for Best Cover

Aberhart Starts Here by Lara Strongman with Laurence Aberhart  (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū), designed by Peter Bray, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū

Baby by Annaleese Jochems (Victoria University Press), designed by Keely O’Shannessy

Black Marks on the White Page edited by Witi Ihimaera and Tina Makereti (Penguin Random House), designed by Kate Barraclough, Kate Frances Design, cover illustrator James Ormsby

Huia Come Home by J. Ruka (Oati), designed by Alistair McCready

The Long Dream of Waking: New perspectives on Len Lye edited by Paul Brobbel, Wystan Curnow and Roger Horrocks (Canterbury University Press), designed by Alice Bonifant

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Salt Picnic by Patrick Evans (Victoria University Press), designed by Keely O’Shannessy

Mary Egan Publishing Award for Best Typography

Huia Come Home by J. Ruka (Oati), designed by Alistair McCready

A Moral Truth edited by James Hollings (Massey University Press), cover design by Gideon Keith, Strategy Creative, interior design by Gideon Keith and Carla Sy

New China Eyewitness: Roger Duff, Rewi Alley and the art of museum diplomacy edited by James Beattie and Richard Bullen (Canterbury University Press), designed by Aaron Beehre

Allen Curnow Biography and Poems Slipcase edition by Terry Sturm. Edited by Linda Cassells, Elizabeth Caffin and Terry Sturm (Auckland University Press), cover design by Sarah Maxey, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Tears of Rangi by Anne Salmond (Auckland University Press), cover design by Keely O’Shannessy, interior design by Katrina Duncan

Ten x Ten: Art at Te Papa edited by Athol McCredie (Te Papa Press), designed by Gideon Keith, Strategy Creative

Allen & Unwin Young Designer of the Year 2018 Shortlist

Rachel Clark for The Art of Simple by Eleanor Ozich (Penguin Random House), Bird Words edited by Elisabeth Easther (Penguin Random House), Heloise by Mandy Hager (Penguin Random House), Hideaways by Hilary Ngan Kee and photography by Sam Stuchbury

Emma Jakicevich for Behind Bars – Real-life stories from inside New Zealand’s prisons by Anna Leask (Penguin Random House), Black Barn: portrait of a place by Gregory O’Brien & Jenny Bornholdt with photography by Brian Culy (Penguin Random House), Colours for Kiwi Babies/ Counting for Kiwi Babies by Matthew Williamson (Penguin Random House), Pieces of You by Eileen Merriman (Penguin Random House), Sleeps Standing by Witi Ihimaera with Hemi Kelly (Penguin Random House)

The winners of each category will be announced at a special ceremony on Thursday 26 July when the Gerard Reid Award for Best Book sponsored by Nielsen Book will also be revealed.

The PANZ Book Design Awards were established by the Publishers Association of New Zealand (PANZ) to promote excellence in, and provide recognition for, the best book design in New Zealand.

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Further details are available at www.bookdesignawards.co.nz

To view finalist cover images, please visit www.bookdesignawards.co.nz

THE JUDGING PANEL:

David Coventon MA PGCE (convenor)
A graduate of the Masters in Graphic Design at Central Saint Martins, David has over 25 years’ experience across music, arts and publishing client base in London and Auckland. David was co-founder of two: design London, course leader of the Bachelor in Graphic Design at Camberwell College, and a key member of the staff and student team that re-started the Camberwell Press.

Back in New Zealand David worked as a graphic designer at Auckland Museum in the Brand and Customer Engagement team for four years. This year he took a Senior Lecturer position teaching graphic design on the Communication Design Bachelor at AUT School of Art & Design.

Janson Chau immigrated from Hong Kong to New Zealand in 1994. Since joining Alt Group as a designer in 2010, he has been involved in graphic, experiential, digital and print design. He has been involved in the design, production and publication of a number of modest books and continues his obsession with the form of the book and a reader’s interaction with idea and content.

Anna Brown is a New Zealand-based designer and typographer. She works collaboratively in book design exploring innovative narrative forms that result in gallery-based experimental book installations and participatory performance works as well as catalogues and artists’ books. Much of her work investigates the concept of the expanded book in a digital age.

Anna taught for eight years in the School of Design at the College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington where she is Associate Professor and Director: Projects and Partnerships.

Kiran Dass is the book buyer for Time Out Bookstore in Mt Eden, Auckland and has 12 years’ experience in the book trade. A writer and reviewer, Kiran has covered books and music for the NZ Herald, NZ Listener, Sunday magazine, Sunday Star-Times, Landfall, Metro, The Spinoff, Pantograph Punch and The Wire (UK).  She also reviews books on Radio New Zealand’s Nine to Noon show and Auckland’s 95bFM.

FOR INTERVIEWS OR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Sandra Noakes

on behalf of PANZ, 0275 7676 75

Thanks to our Sponsors

 

Q & A with Hugo Setzer

By News

Headlining the PANZ International Conference in June will be Hugo Setzer, Vice President of the International Publishers Association & CEO of Manual Moderno, Mexico. Hugo recently took the time from his very busy schedule to answer some questions about his role at both IPA and Manual Moderno, and issues facing the publishing industry.

You’re Vice President of the International Publishers Association. What exactly is the role of the IPA?
IPA works to defend publishers’ interests all over the world, especially the promotion of copyright and freedom to publish, along with literacy. Right now I am catching a plane to Toronto to testify on behalf of international publishers as part of the Canadian Copyright Act review. At the same time, the IPA is holding a Regional Seminar in Lagos, Nigeria, attended by our President, Michiel Kolman and our Secretary General, José Borghino.

In your day job you’re CEO of academic publisher Manual Moderno. Could you tell us a little about what that involves? 
Manual Moderno is a medium sized academic publishing house, with headquarters in Mexico City and a subsidiary office in Bogotá, Colombia. We translate many of the books we publish into Spanish, so this takes me every year to Frankfurt. But we also publish a lot of local authors and contact with them is equally important. I have a great executive team at the office, which currently allows me to dedicate more time to IPA.

Do you have a book that you’re most proud of publishing? 
Yes, though it’s not the kind of book we usually do. It is a social responsibility project we developed with teachers of a university and physicians of a hospital. It is a guide for parents with visually impaired children, so they can learn how to better attend to their needs. Thanks to the authors and our suppliers who donated their work, we could provide the hospital with 1,000 hard copies of the guide completely for free, so they could give them to families in need with a case of a visually impaired kid. It’s also available for free in digital format (click here)

Any major international trends in publishing right now that you’re able to share? 
We can see a worldwide attack on copyright. Large companies with their own interests are lobbying against copyright and many people fall for the “information for free” speech. As IPA, with our limited resources, we engage everywhere we can to help our members defend their interests and the copyright laws. Recently we had this debate in Colombia and now in Canada, where I have had the opportunity to work with our members on the ground in defence of copyright.

What are you reading right now?
I am reading Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now. Really enlightening!

The PANZ International Conference is taking place on Thursday 28 and Friday 29 June 2018. Programme details are available here. Early bird rates available until 25 May. Don’t miss out book your place here.